Why Quake Changed Games Forever

Quake changed more than just game hardware. Its code was so well written that it’s still used in games today. Bits of the original Quake code run under the hood in the Call of Duty games, including the upcoming Modern Warfare 3. Valve’s engineers were familiar with the Quake engine when they were creating the Source engine that powers everything from Half-Life 2 to the upcoming Dota 2. “We licensed Quake to Valve when they were starting their company and they built Source using Quake, and Quake code is still in Source even today. Inside of some DLLs, there’s still some Quake code running in there,” says Romero.

In fact, Quake was so well-written that aspects of it haven’t required changing in fifteen years. Says Jay Stelly of Valve, “We had access to Quake & Quake II when building Source and we definitely made use of that. Some of the Quake code does its job just fine even today.”

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Mirror's Edge: A Leap of Faith

sweez:

But for all of Mirror’s Edge’s unique ideas and vibrant atmosphere, it was deeply flawed. Perhaps the game’s most enduring black mark is its combat. Though the game’s marketing emphasized the “flight, not fight” aspect of its free-running in the run up to its launch, there are a lot of men with guns. Sometimes it’s handled elegantly: A particularly beautiful piece of level design in the last mission has you fend off several of the toughest soldiers in the game with nothing more than a few kicks, for instance. But at many other times it locks you into a series of tighter and tighter spots until you’re forced to disarm opponents, steal weapons and rely on your twitch-shooter reflexes. Mirror’s Edge only works when it’s being Mirror’s Edge, and many gamers felt understandably let down when it forced them to play something else.

Spot on. Never finished the game, and I think I never will.

Had its flaws, but it was a really fun game. I had no issues with the fighting system except with the “boss” fight which was fucking annoying.

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